SONS OF DEWITT COLONY TEXAS
2000, Wallace L. McKeehan, All Rights Reserved
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San Jacinto Battle Flag, Becomes Property of State in Joint Session of Legislature on 97th Anniversary. 


San Antonio Express newspaper, April 22, 1933, Saturday.

Shermans San Jacinto FlagAUSTIN, TEXAS. APRIL 21.  Events of the Battle of San Jacinto, fought 97 years ago to obtain freedom for Texas from Mexican rule and of the more modern World War, were recalled by the Texas legislature today on the anniversary of General Sam Houston's victory over Santa Anna. A flag carried through the San Jacinto Battle by troops headed by General Sidney Sherman, who brought his fighters from Kentucky, was presented to the state in formal ceremonies held in the Texas House of Representatives.

The senate moved to the House in a body to participate in the program. Later the House visited the Senate to attend the presentation of a portrait of Major General Henry T. Allen, who commanded the 90th Division, comprising mostly Texans, in the war overseas. The San Jacinto battle flag was presented by William E. Kendall of Houston, grandson of General Sherman. Coke Stevenson of Junction, speaker of the House, accepted the cherished banner for Texas.

Mrs. Lucy Sherman Craig of Houston, only living daughter of the soldier who commanded the left wing of the Houston fighters witnessed the presentation. The flag was presented to General Sherman and his men when they left Newport, Ky., on their adventurous journey to Texas to help the war of independence. The banner was presented to the state many years ago, but was only recently rehabilitated by legislative appropriation and hung in the House of Representatives.

A California flag mender sewed the remnants together and recreated the flag under direction of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas. Mrs. O. M. Fransworth of San Antonio, president of the D.A.R., was presented as the person whose efforts made the preservation of the flag responsible. Beauford Jester of Corsicana, president of the board of regents of the University of Texas, and an officer in General Allen's division, made the principal speech incident to presentation of the World War hero's portrait. Senator Will D. Pace of Tyler, also an officer under General Allen during the World War 1, made the acceptance speech.

Provided courtesy of Randall Tarin from the files of Alamo de Parras


SONS OF DEWITT COLONY TEXAS
2000, Wallace L. McKeehan, All Rights Reserved